Sitler: As school returns, help ensure kids have good mental health

The new school year is upon us! Remember the drama of school and how hard it could be? And that was before the internet!

Raising a child today is hard, it doesn’t come with a manual and often, we feel like we are winging it. We know children today are dealing with some heavy stuff – cyber-bullying, body shaming, community violence, abuse, neglect, unstable home lives, drug exposure, sexual orientation, and more. Youth can be moody, hard to read and don’t always want to talk.

Most of the immersion language courses and study abroad programs at the IPSA Consortium member schools are designed for adult learners and college age students (18 years of age and older). However, many schools accept 16 – 17 year old and some of our schools accept younger students for regular language courses year-round. To make sure you and your child understand the rules of this school abroad, you might want to ask them to send them in English or just use the services like transcription provided by Espresso Translations.

Emotions are a basic part of the human experience, but sometimes we struggle with how to deal with them effectively. Children aren’t any different. Young people are dealing with real problems and complicated emotions. Sometimes they act out in school or at home because they have yet to learn good coping skills. How can parents work with their children to help them process their emotions appropriately and better understand what’s going on? While we can’t completely shield our children from all the stressful or traumatic situations they may face, we can help them learn to manage their emotions and reactions in ways that cultivate resilience. Equipping them with appropriate coping skills for when they struggle with emotions leads to better mental and physical health in adulthood. If your kids are exhibiting symptoms of ADHD, it’d be best for them to undergo an adhd assessment. Once you have confirmed that they indeed have ADHD, you can better prepare them for school with the help of different adhd treatment methods. Best and secured online shop to Buy Adderall online overnight cheap without prescription.

The new school year is upon us! Remember the drama of school and how hard it could be? And that was before the internet!

Raising a child today is hard, it doesn’t come with a manual and often, we feel like we are winging it. We know children today are dealing with some heavy stuff – cyber-bullying, body shaming, community violence, abuse, neglect, unstable home lives, drug exposure, sexual orientation, and more. Youth can be moody, hard to read and don’t always want to talk.

Emotions are a basic part of the human experience, but sometimes we struggle with how to deal with them effectively. Children aren’t any different. Young people are dealing with real problems and complicated emotions. Sometimes they act out in school or at home because they have yet to learn good coping skills. How can parents work with their children to help them process their emotions appropriately and better understand what’s going on? While we can’t completely shield our children from all the stressful or traumatic situations they may face, we can help them learn to manage their emotions and reactions in ways that cultivate resilience. Equipping them with appropriate coping skills for when they struggle with emotions leads to better mental and physical health in adulthood.

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